Black Hills Knowledge Netowork

Last year, Feeding South Dakota provided over 60,000 backpacks filled with food to children in need, reports KOTA News. The backpacks are filled with foods that are easy to prepare for children to eat during weekends and holidays. Feeding South Dakota staff have noted that attendance at schools increases on Fridays due to the backpack program.

Feeding South Dakota intends to reach even more children in 2018 to ensure fewer children go hungry during the school year.

To read more about children and youth in the Black Hills region, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s online news archive.

Published in News

Governor Daugaard is requesting a work requirement from the Trump Administration for some of the state’s Medicaid recipients. As reported by the Rapid City Journal, the change would apply to approximately 4,500 low-income parents without a disability who are also not caring for a child less than a year old. If approved, the proposal would be piloted in Minnehaha and Pennington Counties.

In 2015, the Medicaid population in South Dakota was comprised by 118,000 individuals. Of that population, approximately 68% were children, according to the South Dakota Health Care Solutions Coalition’s Interim Report and Recommendations. Disabled adults comprised 20% of the population and low-income families comprised just 11% of the total Medicaid population. According to the executive director of Georgetown University’s Center for Children and Families, low-income parents are not a primary factor in the total cost of the Medicaid program.

To read more about health and wellness issues in the Black Hills region, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s online news archive.

Published in News

According to a ruling issued by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the Indian Health Service hospital in Pine Ridge, South Dakota has been placed on “immediate jeopardy” status. As reported by the Rapid City Journal, actions taken by the hospital have caused or are likely to cause death or injury to its patients. While on immediate jeopardy status, the hospital will not be able to bill Medicare and Medicaid eligible services to the government.

Documents released by CMS indicated the immediate jeopardy status was invoked following the death of a diabetic male patient who was incorrectly diagnosed at the Pine Ridge hospital.

To learn more about the Pine Ridge Reservation visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s community profile.

Published in News

Physicians working in emergency rooms throughout the Black Hills have noted an increase in emergency visits as a result of illicit and illegal drug use, reports the Black Hills Pioneer. Methamphetamine, heroin and synthetic marijuana are among the most common drug overdoses seen in emergency rooms in the region. Some physicians have also seen heroin laced fentanyl, a powerful drug commonly used to abate pain following surgery.

Although methamphetamine still comprises a large number of drug-related hospital visits, area physicians indicated that more individuals are using heroin due to its affordability. The number of teenage patients admitted for drug overdoses has also risen in recent years.

To read more news about health and wellness in the Black Hills region, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s online news archive.

Published in News

On October 26, 1918, a man was arrested and brought to trial for spitting in public in Rapid City. According to the Rapid City Daily Journal, the anti-spitting ordinance was established in order to prevent further spread of the disease “through the filthy and careless habits of some thoughtless people who persist in expectorating on the floors in public places and on the sidewalks.” The typical fine for the offense was $6, or $92 in 2017 inflation adjusted dollars.

Rapid City Mayor William E. Robinson instructed law enforcement officials to strictly enforce the ordinance in order to prevent further spreading of the Spanish Flu. A physician himself, Robinson attended to numerous patients at all hours during the flu pandemic. However, the mayor’s grueling work schedule and exposure to the deadly disease threw him into a state of exhaustion. He died on December 2, 1918, while still serving as mayor.

In 1918, the number one cause of death in South Dakota was influenza. Lawrence County suffered the greatest number of casualties, with 145 flu-related deaths. Statewide, the disease claimed 1,847 lives—28 percent of the total number of deaths in the state that year. By comparison, in 1917 influenza was No. 20 for causes of death in the state, claiming just 54 lives.

You can learn more about Mayor William Robinson on the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s Mayoral History Page.

Published in Home

Sioux San – Rapid City Indian Health Service (IHS) Facility

The Indian Health Service (IHS) is a federal health program for American Indians and Alaska Natives.

IHS is an agency that operates within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  The United States Constitution, along with numerous treaties between the United States federal government and sovereign American Indian tribal nations established a trust responsibility that requires the government to provide certain services to Native Americans. Healthcare is one of the services included in the United States’ trust responsibility.

Previously, American Indian healthcare was overseen by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) as provided in the Snyder Act of 1921. Seven years later, the BIA began contracting healthcare services through the Public Health Service and continued to do so for approximately 30 years thereafter. In 1955, Congress removed Native American health services from the Department of Interior and placed it under the Department of Health and Human Services. With this placement, the Indian Health Service came into fruition. Today, IHS provides health services for approximate 2.2 million people within 567 recognized tribes in 36 states.

Rapid City, South Dakota is part of the Great Plains Area of IHS. This area includes South Dakota, North Dakota, Iowa, and Nebraska.  The Great Plains Area currently includes seven hospitals, eight health centers, and additional smaller clinics.  Seventeen Tribes share the same geography as these states. Approximately 130,000 individuals receive care in the Great Plains Area of IHS.

Rapid City Boarding School/Sioux Sanitarium/Rapid City IHS Timeline

 1898  Rapid City Indian School was created for acculturation for Native American children from South Dakota, North Dakota, Wyoming, and Montana.  They required them to speak English at the school. 
 1929 - 1930 1930 - The school had a large number of students with tuberculosis and became a Sanitarium School for those students. 
 1933 The Civil Conservation Corp used the facility for a federally funded work relief program.
 1939  The location became the Sioux Sanitarium for tuberculosis for Native Americans. 
 1943 The antibiotic for TB was discovered.
 1955 The Indian Health Service (IHS) took administrative jurisdiction over Sioux San.
 1966 Congress appropriated funds for the pilot IHS Clinic in Rapid City.
 2001 Indian Health Board of the Black Hills created to address issues of care for those eligible. 
2002 Indian Health Board of the Black Hills brings forward issues of patient care. 
2003 A $4 million dollar renovation is started and expected to be complete in 2005.  It includes more lab and x-ray space as well as additional handicapped-accessible restrooms, and more exam rooms. 
2004 Aberdeen Area Office proposes closing the Sioux San inpatient services. 
2004 IHS users bring their unrest about available funding and services to a budget session with local administrators. 
2006 IHS officials sign program justification document to begin a federal process that will help build a replacement facility. 
2007 IHS officials propose an expansion that will be complete in 2012 under the best circumstances which are unlikely.
2009 Sioux San Hospital cancelled all appointments to prevent a further H1N1 outbreak.
2010 Sioux San Hospital’s Hope Lodge caught on fire and destroyed the substance-abuse center because there was no extinguisher system available. 
2016 IHS investigates quality of care concerns regarding Sioux San Hospital.
2017 IHS announces Sioux San will close Sioux San inpatient and emergency services to make way for a new hospital to be completed by 2022. 

Additional Links and Resources

Published in Issues Hub

The Pennington County Commission denied a funding request in the amount of $90,000 for the county’s health facility, reports the Rapid City Journal. The request was made in advance of preparation on the building’s second floor located at 200 Kansas City Street. A specific use for the second floor of the facility remains to be determined.

The total cost of the facility is estimated at $9.1 million. Commissioners opposed to the funding request cited concerns about the yet-to-be determined use for the second floor. The commission rejected the request by a vote of 3-2.

To learn more about Pennington County, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s community profile. To read more news about Pennington County, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s online news archive.

Published in News

The Indian Health Service (IHS) recently set standardized wait times for its patients, reports KOTA News. The agency implemented a 28-day wait for scheduled primary care visits and 48-hour waits for urgent care visits. Tribes that operate on a contract basis with IHS will establish their own standards for wait times.

The change in policy follows a report by the Government Accountability Office which found that wait times were not standardized across the agency. The report indicated that some patients waited as long as a year to be seen by a physician.

To read more about the Indian Health Service, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network online news archive.

Published in News

Students at Rapid City Area Schools will be able to select healthier meal items this school year, according to KOTA News. The new menu line is called “Rapid Choice Collection” and features a number of salads, a chicken bacon ranch sandwich, and more.

The school district plans to implement seven additional meal initiatives, including a menu analysis, which will provide nutritional information on student meals to parents.

For more information on health and wellness topics in the Black Hills, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s online news archive.

Published in News
Monday, 21 August 2017 15:45

Mobile Dental Clinic Visits Belle Fourche

The Delta Dental/Ronald McDonald Care Mobile dental clinic will visit Belle Fourche from August 21-15, reports the Black Hills Pioneer. The mobile clinic aims to decrease the occurrence of dental disease in children and youth. Individuals who are between the ages of 0 and 21 who haven’t visited a dentist in more than two years are eligible to receive services from the clinic at no cost.

The dental clinic is hosted in Belle Fourche biannually and is funded by Pioneer Bank and Trust, the Clarkson Family Foundation, FIrst Interstate Bank Foundation, Shopko, Black Hills Power and Light, and the Banner Fund. Local dentist and dental technicians provide the services at the clinic.

To read more about Belle Fourche, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s community profile or online news archive.  

Published in News

Two years ago, the South Dakota State Legislature passed a law requiring all incoming sixth grade students to get the T-Dap and meningitis vaccines. According to KOTA News, last year approximately 90 percent of incoming sixth graders had not received the vaccines on the first day of school.

This year, the school district has partnered with Regional Health to create an awareness campaign. District officials believe the number of students who did not have the vaccine in time last year was due to lack of awareness of the new requirement. Through the campaign, the two groups hope to promote awareness and increase vaccination rates.

To read more health and wellness news from the Black Hills, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s online news archive.

Published in News

Release by the Rapid City Collective Impact Food Security Oversight Committee: 

RAPID CITY – Since April 2017, Mary Corbine, Food Security Manager at Feeding South Dakota, has been collecting baseline data on retail and charitable food access and eligibility requirements within the Rapid City area. With the recent announcement of impending closures of two Family Thrift locations and Prairie Market, the Rapid City Food Security Oversight Committee has elected to share the following relevant mapping work with the community.

Corbine’s role in collecting and mapping the baseline data to identify critical gaps in food availability and access is especially important in light of the impending closures. Currently, Rapid City is home to 13 grocery stores, which includes grocery sections in retail supercenters such as Walmart, Sam’s Club and Target. Rapid City – the geographic focus of this map – has a population of 74,048, according to the most recent estimates by the U.S. Census Bureau. Per that information, there are currently 5,700 people per grocery store in Rapid City. In October, when the number of grocery stores is set to shrink to 10, the ratio will increase to 7,400 people per grocery store.

Though that estimate is still below the national average of 8,800 residents per supermarket – according to 2016 data from the Food Market Institute and the U.S. Census Bureau – it is likely that many Rapid City stores serve patrons from outside of city limits. Comprised of Pennington, Custer and Meade counties, the Rapid City metro area had a population of 145,641 in 2016, translating to a ratio of nearly 14,600 per grocery store in October.

The following maps display grocery store locations depicted by blue asterisks. The circles depict a walking distance of one-quarter mile and one-half mile. The graded green shading identifies income level – with the darker end of the scale representing lower income and the lighter end of the scale representing higher income. The maps make it clear that the closure of the three grocery stores will create a geographic access gap for residents in Rapid City, especially those with lower incomes.For more information on Rapid City Collective Impact’s food security efforts, contact Mary Corbine at 348-2689, ext. 205, or email her at [email protected].

walking distance rapid city income levels

october 2017 grocery stores walking distance

About the Initiative

Discussions held by Rapid City Collective Impact in 2016 illuminated a need for focused attention on food security in the Rapid City area. By fall, the Food Security Oversight Committee was created with the goal of leveraging existing community resources to better address food needs in the city. The following organizations are represented on this committee:

  • Rapid City Collective Impact
  • Feeding South Dakota
  • Black Hills Area Community Foundation
  • Rapid City Club for Boys
  • YMCA
  • The Hope Center
  • Salvation Army
  • Cornerstone Rescue Mission
  • Youth & Family Services
  • Meals on Wheels Western South Dakota
  • Rapid City Area Schools Student Nutrition Program
  • RCAS McKinney-Vento Program
  • RCAS – General Beadle Elementary
  • United Way of the Black Hills
  • KOTA Care & Share
  • Fork Real Community Café
  • Chiesman Center for Democracy
  • Rapid City Regional Hospital
  • Black Hills Farmers Market
  • Church Response
  • Indian Health Services
  • City of Rapid City  

In an effort to address local food security challenges and support the work of the Food Security Oversight Committee, Feeding South Dakota and Rapid City Collective Impact jointly hired Mary Corbine as Food Security Manager in March of 2017. Over the past few months, Corbine has been collecting and validating data that is being used to map a variety of food security issues, including housing, incomes, eligibility, transportation and charity food access points. Callie Tysdal of the Black Hills Knowledge Network has assisted with data visualization and analysis. Kip Harrington, city planner for Rapid City, has also assisted in map creation.Rapid City Collective Impact is a community initiative, run by the Black Hills Area Community Foundation, which supports a long-term commitment to a common agenda for solving specific social problems. Feeding South Dakota is the statewide hunger relief program in South Dakota.

Published in News
Friday, 11 August 2017 16:47

Hill City - Health & Wellness

Regional Health Community Health Needs Assessment: Conducted by Regional Health, these studies highlight the strength and weaknesses in regional health and access to healthcare in West River, South Dakota. While an assessment for Hill City specifically is unavailable, you can peruse the 2012 PRC Community Health Needs Assessment for the nearby Custer Hospital.  

Hospitals & Clinics

The Regional Health Medical Clinic located at 238 Elm Street in Hill City is a department of the Regional Health Custer Hospital and Clinic. The satellite clinic offers primary care and family medicine.

The Custer Regional Hospital and Medical Clinics is the closest hospital for residents of Hill City. The hospital offers CT and MRI scans, mammography, laboratory, radiology and other services. Learn more about the Custer Clinic and Hospital on the facility’s website.

Currently, a new facility is being constructed for the hospital in Custer. Progress on the new site can be monitored here.

Sports & Recreation

The Central Black Hills features fun outdoors activities of all kinds, including but not limited to, hiking, rock climbing, biking, and camping. There's endless opportunities for playing outside.

The George S. Mickelson Trail runs through downtown Hill City. Following its disuse in 1983, the Burlington Northern rail line was converted for use by outdoor enthusiasts and was completed in 1998.  The trail runs from Edgemont, SD to an area north of Lead and Deadwood. Permits for the 110-mile long trail can be purchased on an annual basis for $15 or daily use for $4.

There are many sporting event venues and parks located in Lead according to the city’s parks and recreation department.

If you’re looking for a special community event, explore Hill City’s local event calendar.

More Information

For more data on the health and wellness of the citizens of South Dakota and the Black Hills, please check out our interactive graphs and charts on the South Dakota Dashboard

Published in Hill City
Friday, 11 August 2017 15:12

Keystone - Health & Wellness

Community Health Needs Assessment

Regional Health Community Health Needs Assessment: Conducted by Regional Health, these studies highlight the strength and weaknesses in regional health and access to healthcare in West River, South Dakota. Assessments are available for the nearby Rapid City Regional Hospital

Hospitals & Clinics

There are no hospitals and clinics available in Keystone. Hill City, located 12 miles from Keystone, has a clinic that provides primary and family care. The Regional Health Medical Clinic located at 238 Elm Street in Hill City is a department of the Regional Health Custer Hospital and Clinic.

Rapid City, located 21 miles from Keystone, boasts a variety of health care services. Regional Health: Regional Health operates several clinics and hospitals in Pennington County. Rapid City Regional Hospital is the Black Hills region’s leading medical center, providing healthcare to the entire region and offering a wide variety of health services, including emergency care, surgery, obstetrics, rehabilitation, pain management, heart and vascular care, laboratory services, and cancer care.

Rapid City Medical Center: Rapid City Medical Center is a medical practice located in Rapid City that employs over 70 physicians and caregivers whose specialties include Dermatology, ENT, Family Medicine, Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine, OB/GYN, Occupational Medicine, Ophthalmology, Optometry, Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, Podiatry, General Surgery, Urgent Care and Urology. Rapid City Medical Center is comprised of six locations, including an urgent care clinic.

Black Hills Urgent Care: With two Rapid City locations, Black Hills Urgent care offers services to care for any non-emergency medical needs. Black Hills Urgent Care provides fast, affordable and convenient solution to a wide variety of health issues. No appointments are necessary, and BHUC promises no long waits or no unexpected cost. Onsite lab work and digital x-ray technology also allow BHUC to diagnose issues faster.

Sioux San IHS Hospital: Operated by Indian Health ServicesSioux San Indian Hospital is located on Canyon Lake Drive in Rapid City. The Rapid City Service Unit (RCSU) hospital provides health care to Indian people in Rapid City and the surrounding area. The clinic has a staff of 22 physicians and 5 mid-level practitioners who provide outpatient adult, pediatric and prenatal care.

Community Health Center of the Black Hills: The Community Health Center of the Black Hills recently opened a new consolidated health center, located on Pine Street in Rapid City. Now CHCBH provides “high quality medical, dental, and mental healthcare to all people, young or old, insured or uninsured, and regardless of one’s financial status.” The new Consolidated Center provides pediatric, dental, and family practice medicine all in one place.

Rapid City Community Based Outpatient Clinic: Located at 3625 5th Street, the Rapid City CBOC provides primary care to Rapid City area veterans. Operated by the VA Black Hills Health Care System, this clinic offers highly qualified physicians and referrals to the Fort Meade and Hot Springs VA campuses.

Sports & Recreation

The Central Black Hills features fun outdoors activities of all kinds, including but not limited to, hiking, rock climbing, biking, and camping. There's endless opportunities for playing outside.

The City of Keystone is home to Watson Park, which was dedicated in 2011. The park is ADA compliant and posts a picnic area and baseball field.

If you’re looking for a special community event, explore Keystone’s  local event calendar.

More Information

For more data on the health and wellness of the citizens of South Dakota and the Black Hills, please check out our interactive graphs and charts on the South Dakota Dashboard.

Published in Keystone

The Department of Veterans Affairs recently offered a demonstration of its new telehealth services, reports KOTA News. Telehealth services are being implemented in the VA as part of an effort to provide greater access to veterans living in rural areas, where access to health services is sparse.

The VA also plans to assist veterans who may not have access to tablets, laptops or phones in order to access telehealth services.

Read more local news about the Department of Veterans Affairs at the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s online news archive.

Published in News

Two proposed initiated measures for 2018 are looking to increase the tobacco tax, reports KOTA News. One version increases the tax on packs of 20 cigarettes would be raised by 50 cents, while a second version raises the tax by one dollar.

In order for the measure to be placed on the ballot in 2018, petitioners will need to gather almost 14,000 signatures of registered voters before November 2017. In nearby North Dakota, voters rejected increasing the current 44 cent tobacco tax to $2.20 cents last year.

You can read the South Dakota Attorney General’s statement on both version one (50 cent tax increase) and version two (one dollar increase) on the SD Secretary of State’s website.

To read more news about government and citizenship, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s online news archive.

Published in News
Wednesday, 02 August 2017 20:08

Rapid City Takes Over Struggling Water System

Residents of the Mesa View subdivision east of Rapid City limits who have been struggling with water quality issues for years are getting some much needed help. According to the Rapid City Journal, the Public Works Committee has unanimously recommended that the city take over the water system to ensure its users have access to better water quality. The system currently run by the subdivision is at high risk of contamination.

To read up on past news articles related to the Public Works Department, click on this Black Hills Knowledge Network online news archive link.

For more information on the government of Rapid City, be sure to check out this Black Hills Knowledge Network Community Profiles page.

Published in News

The Indian Health Service (IHS) issued a statement explaining that the Sioux San Hospital emergency and inpatient departments will close completely within a year ,according to the Rapid City Journal.  The Great Plains Area is the IHS regional division that covers North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, and Iowa.  There are seven hospitals, eight health centers, and several small care centers in the area according to the IHS website. 

Sioux San Hospital is to be converted to a modern 200,000-square-foot hospital including technology advancements that will allow for improved medical care.  The existing hospital is 80-years-old and shifted to an outpatient and urgent care focus.  The new facility will have a similar patient care focus. 

For more information about Sioux San Hospital, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network online news archive.  You can learn more about Health and Wellness in the Black Hills by visiting the Black Hills Knowledge Network issue hub.   

Published in News

The Black Hills Farmers Market moved from Founders Park to 145 E Omaha Street for the 2017 season.  According to KEVN-Black Hills Fox, the move means there is more parking for visitors.  One vendor, Tobias Garden says this is their second year with the Black Hills Farmers Market and thanks to cover their crops are doing well despite the heat.

The Black Hills Farmers Market is open Tuesdays from 2pm – 6:30pm and Thursdays and Saturdays from 8am – 2pm.  The Black Hills Farmers Market is able to take EBT/SNAP Benefits as well as credit and debit cards.  You can visit their information booth on market days for full details.

To read more about area farmers markets, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network online news archive.  

Published in News

Hunter Moyer, M.D. will join the Regional Health Medical Clinic as a plastic surgeon reports the Meade County Times Tribune.  Dr. Moyer is board certified and specializes in cosmetic and reconstructive surgery.  You can schedule an appointment with Dr. Moyer by calling 605-755-5700.  He will work in the Western Hills Professional Building in Rapid City.

To learn more about Regional Health, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network online news archives or the Regional Health website.  You can learn more about health and wellness in the Black Hills by visiting the Black Hills Knowledge Network issue hub.  

Published in News
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